Mountain View Country Inn

 

36 Botha Street / PO Box 14

Lady Grey

9755

 

Phone: 051-603-0421

Fax: 051-603-0114

 

Email: mountainview@ladygrey.co.za

Royal MacNab Lady Grey - John MacNab - was he a gentleman or a tramp? With time the challenge of Macnab changed to the modern day version of shooting a free-ranging buck, catching a game fish and shooting a game bird all in one day during legal shooting light. The event usually takes place during a weekend in June. Royal MacNab Lady Grey - John MacNab - was he a gentleman or a tramp? With time the challenge of Macnab changed to the modern day version of shooting a free-ranging buck, catching a game fish and shooting a game bird all in one day during legal shooting light. The event usually takes place during a weekend in June. Royal MacNab Lady Grey - John MacNab - was he a gentleman or a tramp? With time the challenge of Macnab changed to the modern day version of shooting a free-ranging buck, catching a game fish and shooting a game bird all in one day during legal shooting light. The event usually takes place during a weekend in June. Royal MacNab Lady Grey - John MacNab - was he a gentleman or a tramp? With time the challenge of Macnab changed to the modern day version of shooting a free-ranging buck, catching a game fish and shooting a game bird all in one day during legal shooting light. The event usually takes place during a weekend in June. Royal MacNab Lady Grey - John MacNab - was he a gentleman or a tramp? With time the challenge of Macnab changed to the modern day version of shooting a free-ranging buck, catching a game fish and shooting a game bird all in one day during legal shooting light. The event usually takes place during a weekend in June. Royal MacNab Lady Grey - John MacNab - was he a gentleman or a tramp? With time the challenge of Macnab changed to the modern day version of shooting a free-ranging buck, catching a game fish and shooting a game bird all in one day during legal shooting light. The event usually takes place during a weekend in June. Royal MacNab Lady Grey - John MacNab - was he a gentleman or a tramp? With time the challenge of Macnab changed to the modern day version of shooting a free-ranging buck, catching a game fish and shooting a game bird all in one day during legal shooting light. The event usually takes place during a weekend in June.

“Was he a gentleman or a tramp? ”

Lady Grey

ENQUIRIES

Caspie Vorster

082 494 3570

 

Royal MacNab

The Macnab challenge of John Buchan

 

The challenge of the Macnab originates from a book written by John Buchan, published in 1925 under the title John Macnab.  It is an adventure story about three members of London’s upper class society, a banker, a cabinet Minister and an ex-attorney general.   Sitting at their club, utterly bored, they concocted a rejuvenating challenge that would add a little danger and excitement to their lives. 

A challenging note, stating a date that one John Macnab intends to poach from their estates without being caught, was sent to three prominent Scottish landowners.   In the case of success the landowners had to donate £50 to a charity of their choice.  In the case of failure, John Macnab would donate £100 to a charity.  The landlords hired men to keep guard 24 hours a day and the chances of success was rated at one in a hundred.

The interesting part of the story is that the three poachers all operated under the name “John Macnab”.  Two of them had to poach a deer each, and one had to catch a salmon.  Birds did not feature in the story.  The hunters used several helpers and planned their actions meticulously in order to distract the guards.

Sightings of the poacher “John Macnab” caused confusion as there was conflicting evidence about his identity.  Was he a gentleman or a tramp?

One hunter was caught but he escaped.  The other hunter successfully poached a deer and the other caught his salmon.

With time the challenge of Macnab changed to the modern day version of shooting a free-ranging buck, catching a game fish and shooting a game bird all in one day during legal shooting light.

The challenge of the Macnab originates from a book written by John Buchan, published in 1925 under the title John Macnab.  It is an adventure story about three members of London’s upper class society, a banker, a cabinet Minister and an ex-attorney general.   Sitting at their club, utterly bored, they concocted a rejuvenating challenge that would add a little danger and excitement to their lives.  
A challenging note, stating a date that one John Macnab intends to poach from their estates without being caught, was sent to three prominent Scottish landowners.   In the case of success the landowners had to donate £50 to a charity of their choice.  In the case of failure, John Macnab would donate £100 to a charity.  The landlords hired men to keep guard 24 hours a day and the chances of success was rated at one in a hundred.
The interesting part of the story is that the three poachers all operated under the name “John Macnab”.  Two of them had to poach a deer each, and one had to catch a salmon.  Birds did not feature in the story.  The hunters used several helpers and planned their actions meticulously in order to distract the guards. 
Sightings of the poacher “John Macnab” caused confusion as there was conflicting evidence about his identity.  Was he a gentleman or a tramp?
One hunter was caught but he escaped.  The other hunter successfully poached a deer and the other caught his salmon. 
With time the challenge of Macnab changed to the modern day version of shooting a free-ranging buck, catching a game fish and shooting a game bird all in one day during legal shooting light.

Lady Grey-Home | The Village | Accommodation | History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accommodation

Also Visit...

 

 

 

 

Annual Events...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page sponsored by — Mountain View Country Inn — Lady Grey

The Challenge

The challenge of the Macnab originates from a book written by John Buchan, published in 1925 under the title John Macnab.  It is an adventure story about three members of London’s upper class society, a banker, a cabinet Minister and an ex-attorney general.   Sitting at their club, utterly bored, they concocted a rejuvenating challenge that would add a little danger and excitement to their lives.  
A challenging note, stating a date that one John Macnab intends to poach from their estates without being caught, was sent to three prominent Scottish landowners.   In the case of success the landowners had to donate £50 to a charity of their choice.  In the case of failure, John Macnab would donate £100 to a charity.  The landlords hired men to keep guard 24 hours a day and the chances of success was rated at one in a hundred.
The interesting part of the story is that the three poachers all operated under the name “John Macnab”.  Two of them had to poach a deer each, and one had to catch a salmon.  Birds did not feature in the story.  The hunters used several helpers and planned their actions meticulously in order to distract the guards. 
Sightings of the poacher “John Macnab” caused confusion as there was conflicting evidence about his identity.  Was he a gentleman or a tramp?
One hunter was caught but he escaped.  The other hunter successfully poached a deer and the other caught his salmon. 
With time the challenge of Macnab changed to the modern day version of shooting a free-ranging buck, catching a game fish and shooting a game bird all in one day during legal shooting light.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Origin of the Lady Grey Royal MacNab challenge

 

In the late 1990’s border farmers from Lady Grey experienced an increase in stock theft.  This was of great concern and twelve years ago, Aubrey Fincham, Soon Cloete, Deon Vorster, Gawie Naudé, and Riaan Naudé had a meeting to find a solution.  They decided to employ a guard to patrol the farms on foot.  The idea of the Lady Grey Royal MacNab was born with the purpose of funding the employment of the guard.  It was a small start with 5 founder members and 4 hunters.  The Royal MacNab has grown into a fun filled three day event, has 25 members and can accommodate up to 26 hunters. 

The event usually takes place during a weekend in June.  It starts with a pub-lunch at Mountain View Country Inn on the Friday where the participants meet each other and the organisers.  After lunch the participants are given the opportunity to adjust their rifles and shoot guinea fowl.  The Hunt takes place on the Saturday.  A highlight of the event is the Scottish Evening that takes place on the Saturday evening.  The MacNab ends on the Sunday morning with a special Church service and the East London Caledonian Pipers providing the music.